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    • CommentAuthorcbenny123
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2011
     permalink
    I have three kindle fire devices for each of the kids. I have successfully set up one kindle with Opendns and it has passed the test. The ip address of that kindle shows a static ip address that is the public one registered with my home network. Now if I go to www.internetbadguys.com on my home computer it shows the demonstration page (what I want at the moment). The 2nd and 3rd Kindles, however, cannot even get on the internet when I select the static ip and put in opendns's two addresses. I have tried pointing to the same ip address listed on the working kindle (which is public) as well as listing the device's private ip address found on the 2wire network page. When I originally programed the first kindle I believe I typed in the device's ip address? Hard to remember now with all the trials and errors I've been dealing with. Would appreciate any advice on how to get the three devices working with *high* filters as our kids are pretty young and we'd like to keep them from falling into internet traps while using the Kindles. We've already installed a parental controls app but need to add opendns if they are going to be allowed to view kindle books at all as they can't access the books through the parental controls app. Thanks in advance for any help. Plan to wrap these babies in a week to stick under the tree....
  1.  permalink
    I have no idea what you are attempting to do with a device's "static IP address" or where you are typing any of these addresses.

    But the instructions for setup are always available at the same place:
    https://store.opendns.com/setup/

    Maybe "select the static IP" means the setting on the device where you can configure static DNS addresses?

    "I have tried pointing to the same ip address listed on the working kindle (which is public) as well as listing the device's private ip address found on the 2wire network page."

    OK. A device has either a public IP address or a private IP address. If it has both, it has more than one internet connection, i.e., a private IP in your LAN by which it is recognized by the 2Wire, and a public IP from the Kindle wireless network from Amazon (Whispernet or whatever they offer in your area).

    Note that private IP addresses are meaningless to the internet and OpenDNS - you cannot add a private IP address to the Dashboard as a Network. You must enter a public IP.

    Also, no two devices can have he same IP. They cannot share a private IP on the LAN, nor can they individually share a public when connected directly to the internet. If this is what you are changing, don't. There isn't any reason to do so, and will certainly break things.

    So, do these Kindles connect to the 2Wire, wireless internet, or both?

    And for future reference, what sort of 2Wire gateway do you have? Is it DSL, or a device which controls IPTV and/or VOIP telephony as well as an internet connection? The model number works here just as well.


    One scenario: You want filtering only on the Kindles, with internet connectivity provided by your LAN.

    You configure the static DNS entries on each of the Kindles with the OpenDNS addresses. You add the one and only public IP address of your 2Wire to the Dashboard to create your OpenDNS Network. Configuration is done, do nothing else.

    Another scenario: The Kindles connect directly to the internet.

    On each Kindle, you configure the OpenDNS resolver addresses. Now, on each Kindle, *separately*, you go to the OpenDNS site, create an account, then add the device's public IP to the Dashboard to create a Network. That is, there will be three OpenDNS accounts, one for each public IP = one for each device.

    ---

    Now, here is the thing: The public IPs of the Kindles are undoubtedly not static, but dynamic. It is also likely in the extreme that the public IP of the 2Wire is also dynamic, unless you know for certain that it is static. (If you do get VOIP or IPTV through the 2Wire, the IP may be "sticky" but technically not static.)

    You must run an Updater to keep the IP addresses in sync with the OpenDNS Dashboard for each, or the filtering settings will not hold. But you cannot run an Updater on the Kindles.

    So if they connect to the internet directly (as in the second scenario), you would need to manually check and update the IP at the Dashboard for each device, with each device, respectively. *You cannot control the OpenDNS settings for one device (public IP) from another.*

    If the Kindles connect to the internet from your LAN, you only have one OpenDNS Network to control, which can be done from any device or computer from within you LAN. An Updater can be run on any computer in your LAN.


    Does this help at all? I know it is verbose, but I am trying to fully describe the differences between the two main possible type of internet connections here.


    One more note about Kindles. They use a proxy which will cause filtering to fail and you would see that you are not using OpenDNS when visiting http://welcome.opendns.com

    This post describes how to turn it off:
    https://forums.opendns.com/comments.php?DiscussionID=12155&page=1#Item_11
    • CommentAuthorcbenny123
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2011 edited
     permalink
    thx maintenance.

    The Fire has a settings page which asks if you would like to set a static ip address for your device. The only way to alter the DNS address is to turn this on. It then asks for your device's ip address in your network, the router address, the subnet mask, and then asks you to type in the two DNS addresses you would like to use (which is the OpenDNS addresses you provide 208.67.222.123 and 208.67.220.123)

    I entered my public ip address listed on my 2WIRE account (btw it is listed on 2WIRE as a static ip). I had to do this on the first device to get the protection, it seems. This is not the same as my router gateway address that is a LAN with a DHCP configuration. I registered the 2WIRE static ip on OpenDNS website for our household. When I enter the two Open DNS addresses you provide on the additional devices I will get internet access but will not get protection. So it is not working on them. The original Kindle device is listed with the public static ip address on its settings page (provided by 2WIRE and registered with Opendns) and is working with opendns protection, however.
    Thanks for helping me understand how the system works. Oh, and these devices are only capable of Wifi connection on my network. There is no internet wireless for them at all. Let me know if there is something I am missing here.
    Thankful People: maintenance
  2.  permalink
    From your first paragraph, this would be a Private IP address only, and has nothing to do with the internet or configuring your OpenDNS Network Dashboard.

    Now, bear in mind that if you set a static LAN IP for the device this:

    1) cannot be the same as any other device in the network, so increment the last digit by 1 for each device

    2) must be an IP in the subnet range already configured at the router. so if your devices have IPs like 192.168.0.1, choose unused IPs following the pattern 192.168.0.2, 192.168.0.3 ... You must account for the IP addresses in use by other computers/device in the network. It would probably be best to set the router for all static IPs, and change the other computers so that the IP they have is now static. Otherwise, you will likely need to change the DHCP rage on the router to exclude the static IPs you want to use.

    "I entered my public ip address listed on my 2WIRE account (btw it is listed on 2WIRE as a static ip)."

    Entered at the Network Dashboard? Good. This covers your *entire network*.

    "I had to do this on the first device to get the protection, it seems."

    Well, it does not matter what device in your network you are using when you configure the Dashboard. If you mean something else, pleas explain.

    Note: Don't save your OpenDNS login password in the browser on the Kindle. Or anyone use the Kindle has access to your Dashboard.

    "I registered the 2WIRE static ip on OpenDNS website for our household. "

    If your IP is static, you have no need for an updater client. Excellent.

    "When I enter the two Open DNS addresses you provide on the additional devices I will get internet access but will not get protection. So it is not working on them."

    Oh, *I* don't provide anything but forum support. Just FYI.

    If you don't have filtering, then you need to flush the browser cache (no idea how here) and local resolver cache (reboot) per device. You *must* turn off any Web page acceleration or proxy as described in the link I gave you.
    https://forums.opendns.com/comments.php?DiscussionID=12155&page=1#Item_11

    "The original Kindle device is listed with the public static ip address on its settings page (provided by 2WIRE and registered with Opendns) and is working with opendns protection, however."

    Your home network label is listed with your public IP address which is provided by your ISP on your one and only settings page at the Dashboard. OpenDNS does not list or recognize devices of any sort. Just your public IP, and the label you gave your network.

    As to the Wi-Fi, I don't know, it depends on the model and the region or country in which you live. Many Kindles connect to a free wireless service that allows one to download books from the kindle store, at least. I'm not aware of the extent of the services or on which devices this is available.
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=200375890
    • CommentAuthoropendnsjp
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2011
     permalink
    "The Fire has a settings page which asks if you would like to set a static ip address for your device."

    You must enter a static INTERNAL IP address here, not EXTERNAL IP...

    Beware that doing this means if your kids take their Kindle to school or a friends house it will most likely not work :-(

    Your better off using DHCP on the router to hand out OpenDNS to all devices while they are at home.
    Thankful People: maintenance
    • CommentAuthorcbenny123
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2011
     permalink
    The internal ip addresses do not work on the kindle with opendns. The only way to get one device to work is to use the external ip address on that one device. Then the other two cannot be configured. Our kids are young and will not be taking their kindles elsewhere. Our service has assigned DHCP for our ip addresses on each device. What I can't understand is how to set up only the kindles with the opendns service and not the rest of our devices. I have the opendns set to *high* for the kindles but do like to visit youtube and facebook and twitter, and I do shop amazon.com on home computer through 2Wire and the built in firewall. I noticed that 2wire listed my one Kindle as a DMZ device and disabled the 2Wire firewall on it to get it to work with opendns. The problem is, because it used the only external ip address for our network, I cannot use the same settings on the other two devices. I have also disabled the faster loading option within the silk browser. And *yes* that did make a difference to get the Fire with the external ip address to accept the opendns. I am not seeing a workaround here. My 2wire has an option to set up a separate network.... am wondering if this is necessary or even possible to get the three devices covered under opendns with Fire's silk browser and 2wire network. Please let me know if you see an error in my train of thought. this is all new to me.
    • CommentAuthoropendnsjp
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2011
     permalink
    On a windows computer, go to Start > Run
    type in: cmd
    then press OK
    type in: ipconfig /all

    then paste back here in the forums what you see for...

    IP Address
    Subnet Mask:
    Default Gateway:
    DNS Servers

    Then we can tell you the right static IP information to put in each of your Kindles. None of this DMZ or External IP nonsense should be required.
    • CommentAuthorcbenny123
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2011 edited
     permalink
    have a mac, and with ifconfig got this:
    ifconfig
    lo0: flags=8049<UP,LOOPBACK,RUNNING,MULTICAST> mtu 16384
    inet6 ::1 prefixlen 128
    inet6 fe80::1%lo0 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x1
    inet 127.0.0.1 netmask 0xff000000
    inet6 fd98:b611:6198:61f4:5ab0:35ff:fef8:66e0 prefixlen 128
    gif0: flags=8010<POINTOPOINT,MULTICAST> mtu 1280
    stf0: flags=0<> mtu 1280
    en0: flags=8863<UP,BROADCAST,SMART,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> mtu 1500
    ether 58:b0:35:f8:66:e0
    media: autoselect (none)
    status: inactive
    en1: flags=8863<UP,BROADCAST,SMART,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> mtu 1500
    ether f8:1e:df:f0:2e:f7
    inet6 fe80::fa1e:dfff:fef0:2ef7%en1 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x5
    inet 192.168.1.126 netmask 0xffffff00 broadcast 192.168.1.255
    media: autoselect
    status: active
    fw0: flags=8863<UP,BROADCAST,SMART,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> mtu 4078
    lladdr d8:30:62:ff:fe:f4:ba:ce
    media: autoselect <full-duplex>
    status: inactive
    _____

    on my 2wire this is the info:

    IP Address 99.52.107.78
    Subnet Mask 255.255.252.0
    Default Gateway 99.52.104.1
    Primary DNS 68.94.156.1
    Secondary DNS 68.94.157.1

    not up on linux commands and not too sure how to find them through the terminal on the mac. will look that up if the info here isn't enough.
    Thanks for the help. This has been quite frustrating. I did read a thread about issues with silk and opendns on the Amazon forum board and also about issues with 2wire through att and opendns. So this may not work after all the trouble...

    added:
    within my airport utility on my mac I looked up tcp/ip (using DHCP):
    IPv4 address: 192.168.1.126
    subnet mask: 255.255.255.0
    router: 192.168.1.254
    DNS server: 192.168.1.254
    • CommentAuthoropendnsjp
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2011
     permalink
    So on the kindles enter the following...

    Kindle 1...
    IP Address: 192.168.1.51
    Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    Default Gateway: 192.168.1.254
    DNS 1: 208.67.222.222
    DNS 2: 208.67.220.220

    Kindle 2...
    IP Address: 192.168.1.52
    Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    Default Gateway: 192.168.1.254
    DNS 1: 208.67.222.222
    DNS 2: 208.67.220.220

    Kindle 3...
    IP Address: 192.168.1.53
    Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    Default Gateway: 192.168.1.254
    DNS 1: 208.67.222.222
    DNS 2: 208.67.220.220

    Reboot each of them to see that the change has in-fact taken hold.

    That's it.
    Thankful People: maintenance, cbenny123
    • CommentAuthormaintenance
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2011 edited
     permalink
    This is exactly what should work for you.

    Let me explain. Your Public IP address identifies your network to OpenDNS. This is so the filtering settings you choose are applied to the DNS requests coming from your network. Now, since only the Kindles have the OpenDNS resolver addresses configured, only the requests from the Kindles are served by OpenDNS. Therefore, only the Kindles will have web content filtering. Every other device in your network is sending their DNS requests to the router, which forwards them to the AT&T/SBC DNS servers - no filtering, because OpenDNS does not handle the requests.

    Your concerns for other devices being filtered and your search for a complex solution are unnecessary. Relax - this is easier than you are imagining.:smile: I really hope this helps you to understand. Just follow the recipe laid out by jpelectron and you should be all set. (And a Happy Christmas to you and your children.)

    Now let me again suggest that for any configuration you do at your Dashboard (filtering settings, etc.), that you use your own computer. This way there is no chance that the kids have access to the Dashboard due to the browser saving your password, or the cookies or browser cache allowing the Kids access to your Dashboard if you don't log out of the OpenDNS site. It does not matter that your computer is not using OpenDNS, only that your login is coming from your public IP registered at your Dashboard.

    edit: And don't forget to disable the "Accelerate Page Loading" feature, if present, or filtering will not work. At least not consistently. Described by an upstanding parent with a Kindle here:
    https://forums.opendns.com/comments.php?DiscussionID=12155&page=1#Item_11
    Thankful People: cbenny123
    • CommentAuthoropendnsjp
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2011
     permalink
    "issues with 2wire through att and opendns"

    ...you may be onto something there. It is entirely possible that your make/model of 2Wire device is programmed to ignore any DNS you have set individually on the client (Kindles in this case), and only use the DNS set in the router. (other router manufactures call this DNS proxy or DNS masq) and if you can't disable this "feature" then your right, it's not going to work)
    • CommentAuthorcbenny123
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2011
     permalink
    GENIUS!
    Big cyber hug to jpelectron and maintenance. Worked like a charm. Hope this thread proves valuable to future 2Wire subscribers with multiple kindle fires. To recap for the next guy...
    1. Set up your wifi connection from your home network to the kindle fire.
    2. Open the silk web browser.
    3. at the bottom of the browser there is a menu bar. press the image that looks like a file cabinet (after the right arrow).
    4. a menu will open that includes 6 options. The bottom right option is 'settings'. click on it.
    5. Scroll down until you see a section called 'advanced'. The very top option is called "accelerate page loading" it will be checked by default. Uncheck the box.
    6. Now hit the cog wheel at the top right of your kindle fire. It is found to the left of the wifi symbol. A menu will pop down. Click on the wifi option. You will see your wireless network and if it is properly connected it will be highlighted orange.
    7. Click the cog wheel beneath it called "advanced settings." A new menu will appear. Click the option that says "Static IP settings."
    8. If you are like me and have more than one kindle fire to configure and are using ATT Uverse with a 2Wire modem, then follow the above instructions:
    9. Find your computer's TCP/IP info and subvert the network router and static ip provided by 2Wire as Maintenance described above.

    10. On your machines-- list a DIFFERENT ip address for each kindle (variant numbers came after the "1." on the ip address supplied by your computer (which you have found by doing either ipconfig on a PC or through Airport Utility's TCP/IP info on your Mac)
    11. Inside the box for "Router" on the Kindle Fire just type the Default Gateway.
    12. Fill out the subnet mask (btw, 255.255.255.0 is default)
    13. For DNS 1 type: 208.67.222.123 (opendns address)
    14. For DNS 2 type: 208.67.220.123 (second opendns address)
    15. VERY IMPORTANT! DO A REBOOT OF YOUR SYSTEM. To do this you have to press the off button on the bottom of the kindle and hold it until the fire asks, "Do you want to shut down your kindle?" Press the shut down button. This is a hard reset. Otherwise you are only putting the device to sleep and are not resetting it.

    Hope I didn't miss anything. Thanks a million jpelectron and maintenance. Our kids will be over the moon on Christmas morning and mom and dad won't be so anxious to turn those kindles over with the protection provided by opendns. Am very happy. Am going to pay the $20 bucks for the adfree opendns. Life saver, really. It is just what I was looking for. Oldest is 9 and youngest is 5. Thanks again. :bigsmile:

    :bigsmile:
    Thankful People: maintenance
    • CommentAuthorcbenny123
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2011
     permalink
    Oh, hey--
    I thought I would add that the ip address that is registered with opendns is the static ip provided by 2wire.... Not sure why it is working that way but must add this info so that future users understand the full configuration. To find your static ip with 2wire you need to go to http://www.whatsmyip.org/ and that website will tell you. This is the address you register with opendns, and you should do that first before you configure the kindle fires.
    • CommentAuthoropendnsjp
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2011
     permalink
    "the ip address that is registered with opendns is the static ip provided by 2wire"

    ...actually, that's more likely a dynamic IP assigned by your ISP to the 2Wire. (unless you are in fact paying your ISP extra $$ each month for a static IP)

    "To find your static ip with 2wire you need to go to http://www.whatsmyip.org/ and that website will tell you"

    ...yes, a 3rd party "what is my IP" type site should always report the same IP that is assigned to the WAN/DSL side of your router. and yes, this is the same IP that should be registered with OpenDNS, as that's the only IP OpenDNS can "see"

    "This is the address you register with opendns, and you should do that first before you configure the kindle fires."

    ...right, but realize, the IP from your ISP *may* change at random (unless you are in fact paying your ISP extra $$ each month for a static IP) to keep your dynamic IP (from your ISP) in sync with your OpenDNS account automatically you should use the Updater application (you can run it on any computer behind your router, even if that computer isn't using OpenDNS) just the fact that it's behind the router will cause it to detect the current IP from your ISP, and update that with your OpenDNS account. Your other option is to manually go into your OpenDNS account and update the IP when you find that it changes.
  3.  permalink
    @ jpelectron
    UVerse IPs rarely change (sticky, possibly even static in some cases) because of the VOIP and IPTV. My power was out repeatedly and at great lengths beyond the battery life of the UPS, and my IP hasn't changed since I subscribed to the service. [2009-11-03 16:06:24] Even the connection type is vague: "Direct IP (DHCP or Static)"

    Yet I would still either run an updater, or check the IP occasionally, if I were counting on filtering. Although cbenny123 explicitly states the router indicates "static", somewhere up there.
    Thankful People: opendnsjp
    • CommentAuthorrotblitz
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2011
     permalink
    "13. For DNS 1 type: 208.67.222.123 (opendns address)
    14. For DNS 2 type: 208.67.220.123 (second opendns address)"

    Please note that these are the FamilyShield addresses, not the "normal" OpenDNS resolver addresses. They provide some default filtering (http://www.opendns.com/home-solutions/parental-controls/#family) in case the public IP address is not registered with OpenDNS at a time, whereas the dashboard settings take effect if the public IP address *is* registered with OpenDNS.
    Thankful People: zelus, maintenance
    • CommentAuthorchadhohner
    • CommentTimeDec 27th 2011
     permalink
    On my Kindle Fire, I was able to enter only the OpenDNS Family Shield IPs in the static network info, leaving the IP area blank.

    Worked just fine for me.
    • CommentAuthorgpever01
    • CommentTimeJan 12th 2012
     permalink
    Thank you. I have used this thread to set up the OpenDNS on two Kindle Fires. My problem is that it seems that the filtering is happening on my PC as well as on my childrens' Kindles. I was lead to believe that I would be able to manage the Kindles seperately on my Dashboard. Can someone tell me what crucial mistake I made? . . . I have my Kindles set up like listed in jpelectron post of Dec 16th. Is there something unique I need to do in the Dashboard/network setup within OpenDNS?
    Thanks -
  4.  permalink
    "My problem is that it seems that the filtering is happening on my PC as well as on my childrens' Kindles."

    Did you configure OpenDNS addresses at your router? This will apply any filtering to the entire network.

    "I was lead to believe that I would be able to manage the Kindles seperately on my Dashboard."

    No, you can only manage your Network, as identified by your public IP, at the Dashboard. There is no way to manage individual devices.

    However, if you are using the Netgear LPC version of OpenDNS filtering, you can manage individual Windows user accounts with the supplied applications and the router, where any non-Windows device falls under the same (configurable) default filtering.
    • CommentAuthorcbenny123
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2012 edited
     permalink
    Another resource to help you:

    http://healthy-family.org/caryn/1669/network-internet-parental-controls

    If you set it up using your public IP address and did not make any changes on the router, then you should be able to control just the kindle fires with the OpenDNS. I have three kindle fires configured through the one network I set up on OpenDNS dashboard. Each kindle has its own IP address, as listed in an above post on this thread. My router info with ATT Uverse has never been altered at all. The IP address for each device was created manually by me to serve under the public IP registered in OpenDNS. Hope this helps. Has been working brilliantly in our house. Whenever the kids run into questionable website they are forced to bring the device to me and we discuss whether or not it is safe. I then manually add the sites I approve. I couldn't be happier with the service and I have been paying it forward by voting on domains whenever I get a chance.
    • CommentAuthorbourmb
    • CommentTimeFeb 6th 2012
     permalink
    Regarding jpelectron's recommendation above:
    Why did you select 51, 52, and 53 for each Kindle's IP address above? Why not 40,41, and 42? Or 30, 31, and 32? In other words, do the numbers 51, 52, and 53 play a part?
  5.  permalink
    No, there is no particular relevance other than that they are contiguous and not close to the end of the range where other, still dynamic, IPs would be leased for ease of administration. It doesn't matter at all, really.
    • CommentAuthorbourmb
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2012
     permalink
    Where does one find out the range of numbers that is acceptable relative to th IP address? So I understand, I can have Comcast's IP set in the router for the tv, both computers, and my iPod then setup OpenDNS on each of my kid's Kindle Fires? If this is true, doesn't the Kindle's have to go through two different DNS settings (OpenDNS and Comcast)?
  6.  permalink
    "Where does one find out the range of numbers that is acceptable relative to th IP address?"

    See what range your router is already using for your LAN, i.e., what is already assigned, and just make those static assignments instead of DHCP.

    "So I understand, I can have Comcast's IP set in the router for the tv, both computers, and my iPod then setup OpenDNS on each of my kid's Kindle Fires?"

    Just in the router is fine. Everything else aside from the Kindles should point to the router's LAN IP address. Configure the OpenDNS addresses on the Kindles.

    "If this is true, doesn't the Kindle's have to go through two different DNS settings (OpenDNS and Comcast)?"

    No. DNS requests are served by whatever public resolver the device is set for. By setting the DNS addresses directly on a device, this bypasses the DNS forwarder of the router.

This discussion has been inactive for longer than 30 days, and is thus closed.