Your IP:

Our Forums Have Moved!

Visit our new forums at http://community.opendns.com/forums/ to post on topics and read the latest content. These forums are now read-only archives.

K-12 Forums

Talk with other K-12 network administrators in your state.

Or see all states.

Categories

Vanilla 1.1.4 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

This discussion has been inactive for longer than 30 days, and is thus closed.
    • CommentAuthorerraticus
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2011
     permalink
    I can use the OpenDNS server values set in my router or computer without an account and without the updater installed---and all seems well. How can that be if my IP changes? The dns updater is necessary for stats, whitelisting, blocking, stats, etc, but not for general DNS queries when no account. I've looked around and found no information on how this is so. Could someone point me to a source as to what I am missing here, or tell me in brief way how this works.

    Also, from what I've read, phishing protection is enabled without an account. Is there someplace that explains what features are available without an account regarding site blocking?

    Thanks.
    • CommentAuthorRed Prince
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2011
     permalink
    What do you mean how can it work? It’s a DNS server, it always works. It just gives you the default results without an account. In that case your IP address is irrelevant. Though it can become relevant if you inherit the IP address of someone with an account if that someone failed to update his IP. If that happens, you will get whatever filtering is set up in his account.

    That is why it is best to have an account and to keep your IP updated. No surprises then.
    • CommentAuthorerraticus
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2011
     permalink
    <<What do you mean how can it work?>>

    The way I understand it: A query is sent out. Then the resolver returns the answer to my IP. I have a dynamically changing IP. My modem/router/computer is smart enough to negotiate the return route returning the OpenDNS results with no account and no updater.

    So, if I had an OpenDNS account, with various blocks that I set up, why the need of the updater? What has changed? The results from OpenDNS, in the previous scenario, found its way back with no updater. What am I missing? I am sure the logic is very clear, but I haven't arrived there yet. :-)
    • CommentAuthorerraticus
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2011 edited
     permalink
    <<...it can become relevant if you inherit the IP address of someone with an account...>>

    My IP is an IP assigned to me from my ISP. My gateway address is their address, which I would assume many people would have. No? It doesn't point to my individual computer or router or modem, does it?

    Thanks for trying to help.
    --------------------------------------------------

    edit: Or is that what I am missing here?...that this IP I see as my gateway is unique to me?
  1.  permalink
    "The way I understand it: A query is sent out. Then the resolver returns the answer to my IP. I have a dynamically changing IP. "

    So what? Your query goes out with the information necessary for any resolver to return the answer to your network. Do you need an updater when using your ISPs DNS or google DNS? Do you need an updater so when you ask a website for a page, it gets sent to you? (The answer is "no".)

    The updater keeps you filtering preferences in effect so that when you send a query to OpenDNS, the resolver notes that the IP of origin is on file, and certain filtering should be applied when responding to the query.

    "My IP is an IP assigned to me from my ISP. My gateway address is their address, which I would assume many people would have. No? It doesn't point to my individual computer or router or modem, does it?"

    Your public IP certainly does identify your personal connection to the internet, unless your ISP uses NAT. Then the ISP is responsible for final routing, and you could not add a Network with OpenDNS or use an Updater, as you would be sharing an IP in public address space with other customers of your ISP. A lot of wireless internet providers do this. It also seems to be a feature of connecting to the internet in much of Italy.
    • CommentAuthorerraticus
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2011
     permalink
    :-) I GET IT! Thanks, maintenance!
    • CommentAuthorerraticus
    • CommentTimeDec 28th 2011 edited
     permalink
    "Your public IP certainly does identify your personal connection to the internet..."

    I still think I get it, but if someone outside my LAN does a WHOIS on my "unique" IP address, they would get my ISP's records. No? Because this is true (I think), this is the reason I always assumed that my gateway address was not unique to me. Nobody outside my LAN can connect to me directly using my "public" IP, can they? If they type into their URL box "my IP" address that gets them to my ISP, yes?
  2.  permalink
    "if someone outside my LAN does a WHOIS on my "unique" IP address, they would get my ISP's records"

    Yes, as your ISP owns the address.

    "Nobody outside my LAN can connect to me directly using my "public" IP, can they? "

    Sure, if you set up your network to make this possible. You can host your own website at home, assuming this didn't violate the TOS with your ISP. People connect to their home networks from outside for a variety of reasons using a variety of methods.

    "If they type into their URL box "my IP" address that gets them to my ISP, yes? "

    Generally, it would get them nothing.
    • CommentAuthorerraticus
    • CommentTimeDec 29th 2011
     permalink
    Thanks much.
  3.  permalink
    Sure, no problem. :smile:

This discussion has been inactive for longer than 30 days, and is thus closed.