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    • CommentAuthorparttanna
    • CommentTimeMay 26th 2012
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    I have a typical home network setup; a cable modem, a wifi router, a couple of laptops and a couple of tables/smart phone talking to wifi. My question relates to the IP address associated with the network setup in the OpenDNS. Which IP address should I use? the wifi routers? or one of my laptops? Also, should I select "32 (1 IP Address"? Or Should I create a network for every device connected to my wifi router with the "32 (1 IP Address" selection each.
    • CommentAuthorrotblitz
    • CommentTimeMay 26th 2012
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    The IP addresses you mention are all internal private IP addresses, totally irrelevant to the internet. The only IP address which counts for OpenDNS is your public IP address, assigned by your ISP. This is all OpenDNS sees from you to associate your settings with you.

    So, "network" in the context of OpenDNS means a public IP address where your private network is behind. Therefore yes, select a /32 network, because it is anyway not possible to have more than one network with newer free OpenDNS accounts. And your ISP certainly also only assigns you one public IP address unless you've got a Multi-WAN product and router.
    Thankful People: zelus
    • CommentAuthorRed Prince
    • CommentTimeMay 26th 2012
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    No! Use your public IP address, the one assigned to you by your ISP. And if it is a dynamic IP address (i.e., your ISP changes it every so often), use an updater to always keep it current.
    Thankful People: zelus
    • CommentAuthorparttanna
    • CommentTimeMay 27th 2012
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    Thank you all for your answers. I assume that the IP address, provided by the ISP, can be found in the WiFi router's configuration. Is that the case?
    • CommentAuthorrotblitz
    • CommentTimeMay 27th 2012
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    If this router has a status page, yes, you should find your current WAN IP address there.

    In an ideal case it should be the one you see on the upper left corner here,
    or at http://myip.dnsomatic.com/
    or by the command: nslookup myip.opendns.com.
    • CommentAuthorRed Prince
    • CommentTimeMay 27th 2012
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    Your public IP address is also printed in bright orange on the top of this page (and elsewhere on this forum) right below the OpenDNS logo.
    • CommentAuthormwp101
    • CommentTimeMay 27th 2012 edited
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    So, if I set up my OpenDNS home network on a specific computer that has Mac OS X Leopard, can I assume that my laptop, which has Mac OS X Lion installed, is also on this OpenDNS network? If this is so, if I take my laptop with Lion across the country, is it still protected by my home OpenDNS network? When I first set up OpenDNS, I did not see anything that said I could set it up on OS X Lion.
    • CommentAuthormaintenance
    • CommentTimeMay 27th 2012 edited
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    "If this is so, if I take my laptop with Lion across the country, is it still protected by my home OpenDNS network? "

    No, absolutely not. And you never run an updater in networks you do not own.

    "When I first set up OpenDNS, I did not see anything that said I could set it up on OS X Lion."

    Either the router or every computer in your network must have the OpenDNS addresses configured. If you set the addresses on individual computers, then you must set it up on your laptop as well. I don't expect that the directions for Lion would vary much from the instructions for the previous iteration of OS X. Regardless, I'm certain you can find your network configuration in Lion.
    • CommentAuthorxecrav
    • CommentTimeMay 27th 2012 edited
     permalink
    @mwp101,
    OpenDNS works at the network settings level, thus it works with all operating systems. If you have set up OpenDNS at the router level then all connected computers will use the DNS IPs recommended by the router, in this case OpenDNS 208.67.222.222 & 208.67.220.220

    Now if you setup OpenDNS in a specific computer (locally) [System Preferences/Network/AirPort/Advance/DNS] then only that computer will be using OpenDNS. You will have to individually set it up on each computer.


    --If you take your laptop across the country--

    Q: "if I take my laptop with Lion across the country, is it still protected by my home OpenDNS network?"

    A: The answer to this is No. Your OpenDNS Dashboard settings are tied to your IP address [e.g. parental controls]. Nevertheless, you will still be enjoying OpenDNS fast DNS resolution and phishing protection. For on the go OpenDNS usage you must set OpenDNS on your computer's network DNS settings
    • CommentAuthorrotblitz
    • CommentTimeMay 27th 2012
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    @mwp101
    Are you the same person as @parttanna, or did you just hi-jack someone else's thread?

    "if I take my laptop with Lion across the country, is it still protected by my home OpenDNS network?"

    Yes, if you don't connect directly to the internet, but through a VPN to your home network, and you have the OpenDNS server addresses configured on the router there at home.

    General rule of thumb: OpenDNS is for *your* networks, not for your devices in other networks.
    • CommentAuthormwp101
    • CommentTimeMay 28th 2012
     permalink
    I don't know if I inadvertently hi-jacked someone else's thread, but thank you all for your answers. They were helpful to me.

This discussion has been inactive for longer than 30 days, and is thus closed.