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    • CommentAuthorpeasoup
    • CommentTimeMay 30th 2012
     permalink
    Is there a way to see what time a website was blocked? Four people in our house and the time a site was blocked would give me a much better idea who was looking at what...
    • CommentAuthorrotblitz
    • CommentTimeMay 30th 2012
     permalink
    Aha, another possible hacker victim being willing to open his LAN for the outside world. :shocked:
    Well, this is one of the most asked questions here, so I'm sure you'll find the answer.
    • CommentAuthorpeasoup
    • CommentTimeJun 2nd 2012
     permalink
    Thanks I will look around for the answer. Not sure what you mean by the first part of your comment though. There are two parents and two children (one adult child) in our home.
    • CommentAuthorrotblitz
    • CommentTimeJun 2nd 2012
     permalink
    "Not sure what you mean by the first part of your comment though."

    Well, if OpenDNS would be able to see who in your network has done what at what time, then everybody else connected to the internet could do it as well. Does this idea leave a good and confident feeling with you?
    • CommentAuthorzelus
    • CommentTimeJun 2nd 2012
     permalink
    >>"Is there a way to see what time a website was blocked?"

    OpenDNS Stats does not have the granularity to display DNS requests on any level other than day-to-day at this time.

    >>"Four people in our house and the time a site was blocked would give me a much better idea who was looking at what... "

    OpenDNS, or any other web service, does not and should not have insight of your internal network setup.

    It is not possible for OpenDNS to tell exactly which user on your single IP network is making specific DNS requests since all the DNS requests originate from the same IP address. If you had every user using a different IP and each of these IPs registered in an account then you could track Stats individually that way, but most home users do not have a Static IP block of decent size to work.
    Thankful People: informatica_lfb.es
    • CommentAuthorenigmama
    • CommentTimeJun 8th 2012
     permalink
    I am not a computer expert. In fact, that is the very reason why I am using a service such a DNS. That being said...

    I don't understand how DNS keeping track of which computers in a home network are making which requests and at what times means that "everyone else connected to the internet could do it as well". This information seems like a reasonable expectation from a product that markets itself as "internet security" , as does having access to it w/o the expense of exposing our network to hacking. As a parent trying to protect her family from online pornography and predation, this information could be crucial. Could DNS at least separate outgoing requests from incoming requests? My stats don't seem to differentiate between the two. Is better/more detailed information available with the paid subscription?

    Open DNS markets "parental control", and that I will be able to "protect my family from inappropriate websites", but, judging from some of the other forum discussions, it's not at all difficult for an intelligent and "motivated" teen to find a way around the security. Some of the postings even explain how to do that! Under these circumstances, it seems all the more important that parents have access to as much information as possible.
  1.  permalink
    "Could DNS at least separate outgoing requests from incoming requests?"

    What incoming requests? Is there someone sending DNS lookups to your network?

    "I don't understand how DNS keeping track of which computers in a home network are making which requests and at what times means that "everyone else connected to the internet could do it as well"."

    *If* a DNS server could do this, then, necessarily, anyone else could. But that isn't how the internet and private networks operate, so OpenDNS cannot. The private IP addresses of computers in your network mean nothing on the internet. Only your network public IP does.
    Thankful People: zelus
    • CommentAuthorenigmama
    • CommentTimeJun 9th 2012
     permalink
    I'm sure that my ignorance about how this all works makes it hard to answer my questions. Thanks for being patient.

    By "outgoing" I mean that someone in my house, on my network purposely seeks to go to a location (google, facebook, the football team's website, etc.) via the internet. By "incoming" I mean those things that come to a device (computer, ipod) w/o being actively sought... pop up ads, chat requests from yahoo (apparently now being blocked by DNS since we changed the settings). Does this make sense?

    So, when I look at my Open DNS stats and choose to look at "blocked" sites, I can't tell which have been actively sought out by people on my network (my teenagers) and which ones are things like pop up ads. It would be nice to know the difference. Maybe someone could explain to me how to tell the difference.

    Thanks!
    • CommentAuthorrotblitz
    • CommentTimeJun 9th 2012
     permalink
    "I can't tell which have been actively sought out by people on my network (my teenagers) and which ones are things like pop up ads."

    OpenDNS can't tell you either. They just see DNS lookups out of your network, coming from your public IP address. They do not know if a human being has caused this or some automatic program, nor do they know if a DNS lookup is related to a web page visit, music stream, VoIP or IPTV connection, if its coming from a browser or telnet or FTP or SSH or VNC or VPN or music/movie player client or whatever.

    This is how DNS is supposed to work. It is the phone book of the internet, telling your programs and devices the IP address for a domain name if they ask for it. That's it.
    Thankful People: zelus, enigmama
  2.  permalink
    "By "incoming" I mean those things that come to a device (computer, ipod) w/o being actively sought... pop up ads, chat requests from yahoo (apparently now being blocked by DNS since we changed the settings)."

    Everything incoming was requested from your network. It doesn't matter that a web page, for example, causes lookups for content or scripts (which may cause further lookups and downloading). The requests come out of your network, from the browser in this example, in the course of rendering the site. OpenDNS, being a DNS service, can only see DNS requests (what is the IP address of domain.name.com?), not content or anything else heading down the pipe to your network. And it won't even see every occurrence, as these lookups are cached locally for a time, and content is cached by browsers.

    You may enjoy these references:
    http://igoro.com/archive/what-really-happens-when-you-navigate-to-a-url/
    http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc1918.html See point #3 ("Private Address Space") and briefly skim what suits you to see why your network internals are private by design.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domain_Name_System Specifically, the sections describing what OpenDNS and other public internet resolvers do:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domain_Name_System#Recursive_and_caching_name_server
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domain_Name_System#DNS_resolvers
    "Resolver" also describes what happens in your operating systems and in your router.
    Some of the diagrams, enlarged, may be of interest to you as well.
    Thankful People: rotblitz, enigmama

This discussion has been inactive for longer than 30 days, and is thus closed.