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    • CommentAuthortadaska
    • CommentTimeApr 19th 2009
     permalink
    I have the OpenDNS updater running on my PC as a service but my PC isn't always on so I was wondering if it's at all possible to set up a router to send the IP address to the OpenDNS servers?

    Thank you
    • CommentAuthorRodrigo
    • CommentTimeApr 19th 2009
     permalink
    My router has the option to use dyndns.org to make my dynamic IP can I use this to to send the IP address to the OpenDNS servers?
    • CommentAuthorrotblitz
    • CommentTimeApr 19th 2009 edited
     permalink
    Some routers have this feature implemented. Check your manual and the router settings for this. OpenDNS supports the DynDNS.org updater protocol with two exceptions: OpenDNS supports only HTTPS (not HTTP), and they do not support the myip parameter.
    http://www.opendns.com/support/article/88
    http://www.opendns.com/support/article/83
    http://www.opendns.com/support/article/142

    In principle the router (or any other updater) has to do:
    hxxps://updates.opendns.com/nic/update?hostname=YourLabelName
    Or more explicit:
    hxxps://UserID:Password@updates.opendns.com/nic/update?hostname=YourLabelName
    (Replace xx by tt, YourLabelName by your network label, and your OpenDNS user ID and password accordingly.)
    If you are able to set this up on your router, you are done.

    If your router does not support SSL (for HTTPS), then you can still go through DNS-O-Matic (http://www.dnsomatic.com/), which supports also HTTP.
    Thankful People: ulovan
    • CommentAuthorlexein
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2009 edited
     permalink
    For all these options, remember to configure OpenDNS to "Enable dynamic IP update" in your Dashboard/Settings/Advanced Settings.
    http://www.opendns.com/support/article/109

    1. In their Dynamic DNS section, some routers can be configured for DNS-O-Matic (check it out.) Many are too old to know about it. And no, updating DynDNS won't inform OpenDNS or DNS-O-Matic of your network's updated IP address, which it needs.

    2. If your router doesn't list DNS-O-Matic, but does list "Custom URL", use rotblitz' fine instructions above for updating OpenDNS with https: directly.

    If your router cannot update DNS-O-Matic or OpenDNS at all, try (3) (4) or (5)

    3. Install free new Linux-based firmware on your router, if your router is one of the many which can be so converted. I favor the Tomato firmware. See http://www.polarcloud.com/tomato and http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Tomato_(firmware) .
    Tomato, as most Linux-based replacement firmware(DDWRT,etc), supports Custom URL to update OpenDNS with https: as above, or DNS-O-Matic if you prefer.

    4. Install and configure the dynamic update client on ALL your computers to update OpenDNS directly as above. (Your IP address doesn't matter while they're off, does it?) Every time any of them starts up, if your IP address has changed, OpenDNS will be updated and continue to track your stats like you were never gone. Last I looked, OpenDNS didn't prohibit this because these are "smart": they won't force an update if the current IP matches the old one.

    5. The only no-software, no-firmware update, no-buy options: Make your browser do it. These are not "smart" updates: they're forced every 5 minutes and may eventually violate your Terms of Service with OpenDNS. These techniques will busy your browser every 5 minutes, noticeably so on slow computers.

    5A. Auto-reloaded tab. In a tab which opens every time you start your browser, set the URL as in rotblitz' instructions. Set that tab to reload every 5 minutes (In Opera. Firefox uses https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/115 ). Bookmark it with the username and password. In fact, create an Internet Shortcut and put it in your Startup Folder, so you don't have to think about it.

    5B. Auto-reloading local webpage. Save this HTML to a file called UpdateOpenDNS.html in your Documents folder. Edit it for your Username, Password, and Network Name. Place a shortcut to it in your Startup folder. It reloads itself every 5 minutes, in every frames-capable browser that exists.
    ----
    <HTML><HEAD><TITLE>OpenDNS browser-based forced updater</TITLE>
    <META HTTP-EQUIV="refresh" CONTENT="300;">
    </HEAD>
    <FRAMESET ROWS="*">
    <FRAME SRC="https://uname:passwd@updates.opendns.com/nic/update?hostname=network">
    <NOFRAMES>
    <BODY><H2>Turn frames back on in your browser. Geez, who turns <i>those</i> off?</H2>
    </BODY>
    </NOFRAMES>
    </FRAMESET>
    </HTML>
    ---
    (wow, I can't believe that posted correctly)

    If OpenDNS complains and says, "Don't do 5" of course I'll edit this.
    • CommentAuthorrotblitz
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2009
     permalink
    "Turn frames back on in your browser. Geez, who turns those off?"
    Nobody turns those off. I don't know a browser where frames could be disabled. Do you?
    (Or is it FireFox with a special about:config tweak?)
    • CommentAuthorcool110
    • CommentTimeApr 20th 2009 edited
     permalink
    "I don't know a browser where frames could be disabled. Do you?
    (Or is it FireFox with a special about:config tweak?)"
    browser.frames.enabled
    or use noscript

This discussion has been inactive for longer than 30 days, and is thus closed.