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    • CommentAuthorcd-man
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2007
     permalink
    Hello. I know that this is a muddy territory, but would you guys consider blocking advertiser sites? Something similar to the hosts file at http://www.mvps.org/winhelp2002/hosts.htm

    On a side note: I posted a short tutorial about using the above hosts file under Ubuntu (it works with all Linux distributions, however the tools I listed in the tutorial may not) - http://hype-free.blogspot.com/2007/01/linux-also-has-hosts-file.html
    Thankful People: scdaddyo, srday
    • CommentAuthorpencoyd
    • CommentTimeJan 8th 2007
     permalink
    If we offered this kind of service, it would be as an account preference. It's not top of our list right now.
  1.  permalink
    I don't get why people are so opposed to advertising (at least the relatively unobtrusive stuff). Advertising makes the internet go round, simple. Many if not most sites require advertising to stay online and pay for bandwidth bills etc. Blocking them really won't help innovative and useful new startups.
    Thankful People: az1
    • CommentAuthorfred
    • CommentTimeFeb 4th 2007
     permalink
    Hosts file is not for blocking advertisement.
    A DNS server should not block advertisements.
    The MVPS works but is not how it should be done, its wrong approach.

    Use the Adblock extension for Firefox if you want to block ads.
    * http://adblock.mozdev.org/
    Thankful People: Huy Tran, ghostwind
  2.  permalink
    I use a hosts file on my local dns cache to assist in blocking ad's.

    Something like ad.domain.com and ads.domain.com are redirected to localhost. The benefit of this is I don't have to install anything and create more work for the client pc. And speed, not resolving or going to localhost is faster than AdBlock.

    As for blocking ads, it's my choice. They are distracting and annoying. If you want to support a website by looking at ads, go ahead. I'll be off having a good time surfing and not being annoyed by ads. I don't mind static, to-the-point ads. But the flashy animated ones that distract or take up half the page have a place on my shit list.
    Thankful People: scdaddyo, srday, martijn1986
    • CommentAuthorfred
    • CommentTimeFeb 4th 2007
     permalink
    @clickwir,
    There is a speed impact since it has to match the address it will try to resolve against (a huge?) local list first.
    You are pointing them to (127.0.0.1), so the web browser will actually try to connect to your computer, and this will use resources, its better to point it to 0.0.0.0 which will be quicker.
    Try open the console and do a test of "telnet 127.0.0.1" and "telnet 0.0.0.0" and see which goes faster, and you will see its 0.0.0.0
    Thankful People: portnumber53, scdaddyo, srday
    • CommentAuthorfred
    • CommentTimeFeb 4th 2007
     permalink
    • CommentAuthorahoier
    • CommentTimeFeb 4th 2007
     permalink
    good point, 0.0.0.0 is faster, yes. But 0.0.0.0 isn't compatible with software such as "Homer", eDexter, and HostMan's local-only web server, which is used to replace ads by 1x1 transparant images, instead of blotchy "Page Not Found" errors spread across your viewing area(s) :)
  3.  permalink
    'AdBlock Plus' is faster than 'AdBlock'

    http://adblockplus.org/

    AdBlock has alot of memory leaks and hasn't been updated in a while.
    Thankful People: ghostwind
    • CommentAuthorphoturis
    • CommentTimeFeb 9th 2007
     permalink
    > sirjavabean:
    >
    > I don't get why people are so opposed to advertising (at
    > least the relatively unobtrusive stuff). Advertising makes
    > the internet go round, simple. Many if not most sites require
    > advertising to stay online and pay for bandwidth bills etc.
    > Blocking them really won't help innovative and useful
    > new startups.

    The answer, of course, is quite simple.

    Most advertisements these days are not at all unobtrusive.

    I go on the Internet to read things.

    It is VERY DIFFICULT to read, when surrounding every available block of text is some loud, animated thing bouncing, bobbing, and flashing at me. In fact, these ads make it nearly impossible for me to concentrate on what I am trying to focus on.

    Imagine if books, newspapers, and periodicals had flash banners, or animated gifs... spinning, jittering, and flitting about on every page of text. It would make reading a VERY unpleasant experience, would it not?

    That said, I use Adblock + Filterset.G. It makes the Internet usable again.
    Thankful People: 12021, martijn_westerink
    • CommentAuthorahoier
    • CommentTimeFeb 10th 2007
     permalink
    I like http://www.workfriendly.net/ - it is pretty good at filtering ads out too :P Then again, I may as well just be using Lynx/Links text browser ;)
    • CommentAuthory0himba
    • CommentTimeFeb 11th 2007 edited
     permalink
    I already pay for my Internet connection and the computer I use to utilize it. I don't want or need to be bombarded by adverts everywhere I go. Advertisements are killing the Internet much like they are killing regular TV stations such as NBC, CBS, Etc. They eat up bandwidth and screen real estate, and they even go so far as to infect your computers in an effort to grab the almighty dollar. Blasé attitudes like "makes the internet go round" are just what these advertising leeches need to make money off of you without your consent.

    The hosts file is a valid way to block a lot of these, as well as Privoxy and other similar programs. The problem with the hosts file, if it gets too large it negates the faster DNS service you get through OpenDNS, and can cause the DNS client service in Windows to freeze up and more. I currently use my hosts file to block ads in Xfire, Yahoo, and MSN when I use those bloatware clients. Trillian works much better :smile:

    I want a choice before being forced to look at adverts. The few, unobtrusive adverts that are shown on the OpenDNS search page, I choose to allow those, although they can easily be blocked. This is a great service and they deserve any support I can give them.
    Thankful People: rmarch, cameltoe1966
    • CommentAuthorahoier
    • CommentTimeFeb 17th 2007 edited
     permalink
    I dont have any problems with my 2-3MB hosts file...though yes, I had to disable the "DNS Client" service in Windows XP. But OpenDNs is still workin great :)

    I think the main concern here would be; what's considered an "ad" and what's not? you know? You start blocking "ads" (media.fastclick.net, doubleclick.net and their whole SCHLEWWWW of subdomains...lol, etc..) some may consider it "blocking", where others would consider it "censoring".

    Thats why I like the idea of using a local program/routine of blocking ads...between the HOSTS file, Proxy Autoconfig, eDexter, etc; there's sooo many possibilities already.

    And really, the whole point of OpenDNS is speedy DNS; not to block ads ;) Though granted, blocking ads could speed up your browsing...I know it did for me when I started compiling my HOSTS file years ago.
    • CommentAuthorrokphish
    • CommentTimeApr 6th 2007
     permalink
    I like the idea of an opt-in / opt-out preference for blocking ads. I don't really want OpenDNS selecting which ad servers to block, however. I would prefer to be able to input my own list . . . basically to upload or otherwise input my own host file. I'd also like to ability to edit entries.

    It would also be nice to be able to input a website URL in the Ad Blocking preferences are and have OpenDNS suggest or indicate the ad servers it found.
    • CommentAuthorreport99
    • CommentTimeMay 28th 2007
     permalink
    You can't block advertisements via DNS. When they figure the advertisement is blocked by DNS, they simply use direct IP numbers.

    I think ad-blocking is a software thing rather than server thing unless you run a proxy on your network.
    Thankful People: pdabr, mattrobs
    • CommentAuthorxtrememac
    • CommentTimeMay 30th 2007
     permalink
    opendns should not do any phishing blocking nor ad blocking.
    u should buy a software that prevents those. just like spyware programs. opendns is a dns server in which their primary job is to resolve the ips to the name servers. i don't see why opendns should have ad blocking or phishing blocking as their primary job. on the other hand if they've too much time and resource in their hands they could make account preference.

    I am using Ad Muncher which i think is the best ad blocking software. u can customize it with keyword blocking, server blocking, image blocking etc.. and its fast. i had used it couple of years ago but then thought "why need ad blocking" but nowadays every webpage is bloated with ads and decided to buy it 2 months ago and i'm living adless!!!

    I am well aware that websites/tv channels/etc earn money through these ads but they are boring. they can sometimes be usefull..

    see where i am going with this confusion of mine? Ads are sometimes good sometimes bad and annoying..
    I do not think its opendns's place to be blocking these things.. this goes for phishing as well but its per user setting. (but i'm not sure if not registered users to opendns are able to customize this)
    • CommentAuthorLee
    • CommentTimeJun 5th 2007
     permalink
    "I use a hosts file on my local dns cache to assist in blocking ad's.

    Something like ad.domain.com and ads.domain.com are redirected to localhost. The benefit of this is I don't have to install anything and create more work for the client pc. And speed, not resolving or going to localhost is faster than AdBlock.

    As for blocking ads, it's my choice. They are distracting and annoying. If you want to support a website by looking at ads, go ahead. I'll be off having a good time surfing and not being annoyed by ads. I don't mind static, to-the-point ads. But the flashy animated ones that distract or take up half the page have a place on my shit list."

    Yeah. I think the flash ads which buzz or speak, make any irritating noises or expand over your whole page until you click on them should be illegal (heh). You came to the website to do something, like read an article or download something. Not to be irritated into clicking an ad.

    "opendns should not do any phishing blocking nor ad blocking.
    u should buy a software that prevents those. just like spyware programs. opendns is a dns server in which their primary job is to resolve the ips to the name servers. i don't see why opendns should have ad blocking or phishing blocking as their primary job. on the other hand if they've too much time and resource in their hands they could make account preference.

    I am using Ad Muncher which i think is the best ad blocking software. u can customize it with keyword blocking, server blocking, image blocking etc.. and its fast. i had used it couple of years ago but then thought "why need ad blocking" but nowadays every webpage is bloated with ads and decided to buy it 2 months ago and i'm living adless!!!

    I am well aware that websites/tv channels/etc earn money through these ads but they are boring. they can sometimes be usefull..

    see where i am going with this confusion of mine? Ads are sometimes good sometimes bad and annoying..
    I do not think its opendns's place to be blocking these things.. this goes for phishing as well but its per user setting. (but i'm not sure if not registered users to opendns are able to customize this)"

    I think it's good to be able to block domains and phishing attacks without installing or buying anything extra, it's quicker, and we already pay for the Internet as well as an OS (unless you're cool and use a free one :wink: ) after paying for a PC. We don't really want to pay a bomb of money just to block things which shouldn't be there.

    Occasionally, ads can be good, AdSense or similar advertisements can sometimes be acceptable, they don't invade your page or irritate you, static ads are ok.

    And yes, you can choose whether or not to block phishing attacks in OpenDNS (I think).
    • CommentAuthorahoier
    • CommentTimeJun 5th 2007
     permalink
    Phish blocking is provided in part, by the research and submissions from phishtank.com :)
    • CommentAuthorbait-fish
    • CommentTimeJun 23rd 2007
     permalink
    I too would appreciate the ability to upload or paste in a smallish list (larger than Blocked Domains allows) so I could block a few more than just the worst advertising offenders. The best, IMHO, would be to use Bluetack's host list (see their app, Hosts Manager) where the list is >80,000 entries strong and updated regularly.
    Thankful People: haschbach
    • CommentAuthorahoier
    • CommentTimeJun 23rd 2007
     permalink
    With the way the Blocked Domains list works here at OpenDNS though, surely you wouldn't need that many entries :) Blutetack has a LOT, and how many of those do "normal" people actually "hit" while browsing? Not too many :)

    Granted, I still use that HOSTS file ;) But for DNS blocking, I don't think it's that necessary.
    • CommentAuthorbait-fish
    • CommentTimeJun 23rd 2007
     permalink
    Very true. Intercepting those with the most hits would be the highest priority. Bluetack for DNS would be quite excessive :-)
    • CommentAuthormhendriks
    • CommentTimeAug 6th 2007
     permalink
    I ran across an interesting blocking situation.

    I was tracking and blocking some of the advertising/spam domains (you know, the *clicks.com, *serves.com, etc). And I found a big fish: "akamai.net".
    According to some bloggers this is one of the nastiest spam providers ever, but backed by many big companies (hearsay mind you). I didn't know so I went ahead and blocked them.. Woohee!! Be ready for a surprise....

    CBS, NBC, ABC and probably some more sites won't work at all. I heard Ebay won't work for more than about 50%. That's what I call power!

    Anyway.. Thought I'd share.. :devil:
    Thankful People: tgeraghty, olympus
    • CommentAuthorJoe
    • CommentTimeAug 6th 2007
     permalink
    Akamai operates a content distribution network, many big companies use such networks to push their content closer to their users. Blocking content delivery networks (CDN's) like, akamai, speedera etc. will result in many popular sites to not work anymore.
    Thankful People: OpenDNS User, Micheal
  4.  permalink
    Block "net" -- that'll break even more!
    • CommentAuthorbaydnsme
    • CommentTimeJan 11th 2008
     permalink
    opendns + treewalk + easylist.adblockplus.org = joy


    I would, however, prefer to have the power of treewalk available for free via opendns ;)
  5.  permalink
    I too use adblock but someitmes I just want to use IE since it is a bit faster to load since it is part of the OS. So instead of a hosts file I have entered some domains in my router as banned domains. It doesnt work as nice as adblock but still does the trick. Advertising.com doubleclick.com overture.com etc I only have 8 but the Regular Expressions that the auto updating listing in adblock is nice.

    KieranMullen
    • CommentAuthormamazitta
    • CommentTimeFeb 12th 2008
     permalink
    I really don't need those bouncing, flashing, big-box-sized ads to ENHANCE MY VIEWING EXPERIENCE. Sorry Doubleclick, Overture, GoogleAds, and all you other dipsh*t adbertizers. FU.
    • CommentAuthorvlz
    • CommentTimeFeb 13th 2008 edited
     permalink
    It is possible to block ads on the DNS level using OpenDNS.

    1) Go to "Domain Blocking" and add:
    ad.doubleclick.net
    adlog.com.com
    adservices.google.com
    googleadservices.com
    googlesyndication.com
    google-syndication.com
    servedby.advertising.com
    view.atdmt.com
    mm.chitika.net
    ctxt.tribalfusion.com
    intellitxt.com

    2) Install adblocker.user.js, a greasemonkey script from http://www.reifysoft.com/turnabout.php?p=g
    Since not everything can be blocked at DNS level, using this lightweight and efficient script completes the task.

    3) Install opendnsadblock.user.js from http://seabre986.googlepages.com/
    This one hides those messages saying a domain was blocked.

    Opera has added partial support to greasemonkey scripts and you can use them without worries, just make sure you have Sun Java installed.

    FireFox users must have greasemonkey installed - http://greasemonkey.mozdev.org. Adblock plus users may need only opendnsadblock.user.js

    Internet Explorer users may try "turnabout" to enable greasemonkey scripts - http://www.reifysoft.com/projects/turnabout

    Best regards!
    Thankful People: mrroboto
    • CommentAuthorchampion21
    • CommentTimeMar 30th 2008 edited
     permalink
    see...i don't have a problem with ads. i have a problem with the tracking cookies that they try to leave behind. they can show me as many ads as they want but i do not want them trying to figure me out to show me "relevant" ads.

    if there is something that i want, i'll go out and learn about it, figure out which is better and then go for it on my own. i don't need anyone trying to pitch me stuff because that's how so many people are so deep in debt...impulse buying thanks to ads.

    so that's why i want to block ad sites.
    • CommentAuthorvlz
    • CommentTimeMar 30th 2008 edited
     permalink
    @jachamp: yeah, I certainly agree. I've tried to block doubleclick.net, but since it is now part of Google, I always received some kind of error trying to access my paypal account. I was able to sign in, check my status, but unable to trade.

    After a lil help from our fine mates over here at OpenDNS, we discovered that paypal made a deal with doubleclick. In short, some SSL certificates are now handled by doubleclick... It happened one day after Google have bought doubleclick.

    The only alternative I could see at that moment was to white-list paypalssl.doubleclick.net. I am not aware of any privacy policy changed, regarding Google/doubleclick... waiting to see.

    Actually, I had to white-list msnlivefavorites.112.2o7.net as well, because Windows Live Favourites is using Omniture Inc. addresses to keep synchronised my local favourite folder on the server and vice-versa.

    Before IE7, I used FilterGate (www.filtergate.com) as my Internet filtering solution on Windows. However, it is "not currently working with the newly released IE7", quoting the company... :shocked:
    • CommentAuthormamazitta
    • CommentTimeMar 30th 2008 edited
     permalink
    @brittain
    You don't have to whitelist anything. I have "doubleclick.net" and "2o7.net" in my Block Individual Domains file and I can get to paypal just fine. They only problem is with an SSL Certificate. Because you are on a HTTPS (secure) connection and have those domains in your block list, a connection to "block.opendns.com" is trying to be done but the registered certificate is for "www.opendns.com", thus you get a name error warning popup (at least with IE6). Just answer Yes or No and continue.
    Hopefully someone from support will see this post and take corrective action. I think OpenDNS has to fix their cert and determine if http/https.
    To summarize, the problem is not with you, it is with OpenDNS. Just my opinion of course.

    edit: If running IE6(and maybe 7) and you don't want to see the warning popup anymore, go to Internet Options> Advanced tab> uncheck box "warn about invalid site certificates" (down near bottom of list).
    • CommentAuthorvlz
    • CommentTimeMar 30th 2008
     permalink
    Actually I was using Firefox... About this issue, I've shared a screenshot with pencoyd and we reached a temporary solution that maybe is no longer necessary.

    I couldn't finish an ecommerce process using Firefox or IE7 until I had white-listed that "paypalssl.doubleclick.net".

    Just ignoring the warning wouldn't work because it was a "trackware" used to make sure that I wasn't under any proxy, etc.

    I don't think it was an OpenDNS problem at all. It was me who blocked doubleclick.net. I was aware of it, and that disappeared after white-listening...

    I do keep ad.doubleclick.net and others blocked, exactly because _ generally speaking _ they are just trackware or web-bugs.

    I still do not believe that Google bought doubleclick so "easily", but that is life...
    • CommentAuthorRed Prince
    • CommentTimeMar 30th 2008
     permalink
    Strange . . . . I block all of doubleclick (.com and .net) directly from my own BIND server (so I do not even send a request to OpenDNS for any of its subdomains but just treat them all as 127.0.0.1), yet I have no problem logging on to paypal. I have just checked.
    • CommentAuthorvlz
    • CommentTimeMar 30th 2008
     permalink
    Try to open https://paypalssl.doubleclick.net/ and tell me what you see.
    Thanks in advance.
    • CommentAuthorRed Prince
    • CommentTimeMar 30th 2008
     permalink
    @brittain: Since it is blocked, I see nothing at all.

    As I said, it goes to 127.0.0.1, and there is no HTTPS service at 127.0.0.1. So, all I get is a blank page. That's in my Opera browser. In IE (which I normally do not use, but I have just tried it), I get a "this page cannot be displayed" error page.
    • CommentAuthorvlz
    • CommentTimeMar 30th 2008
     permalink
    @redprince: Ah, that wouldn't help out. I misunderstood you.

    We should find out whether paypalssl.doubleclick.net is on the internal OpenDNS' white-list, since some users are no longer receiving warnings to sign in, trade (transferring money between accounts), and sign out from paypal.
    • CommentAuthorvlz
    • CommentTimeMar 30th 2008 edited
     permalink
    What I am getting visiting https://paypalssl.doubleclick.net/ is nothing else than a simple webpage saying:

    "This is a DoubleClick advertising server.

    Click here for the DoubleClick home page.

    Click here for privacy information.

    Click here to report suspicious phishing activity."

    The certificate, however, is a valid v1 TLS 256 bit AES (1024 bit RSA/SHA) for digital signature, key encipherment, and a two-way authenticator TLS for both Web server and Web client.
    • CommentAuthormamazitta
    • CommentTimeMar 31st 2008 edited
     permalink
    @brittain
    Here's What I get when I go to your https://paypalssl.doubleclick.net/

    First I get warning:
    http://img100.imageshack.us/img100/6696/screenshot020fl6.jpg
    click OK, then:
    http://img248.imageshack.us/img248/2469/screenshot017rf0.jpg

    I have "doubleclick.net" in my Block Individual Domains list.

    I believe the issue is with opendns cert and https connections involving domains in block lists.
    Also, some people will get warnings, others will not. Depends on their PC
    settings. In any event, I believe this has to be looked into by OpenDNS staff.
    Just my opinion of course.

    edit: results are from Firefox. Similar type message with IE6.

    edit2: Nobody goes directly to paypal via the link you provided (paypalssl), so results are not indicative of real life situation.
    They usually go via: https://www.paypal.com
    This does not cause the opendns blocked domain message box to appear as in above example (last link). It just supresses the ads/tracking done by doubleclick, etc.
    • CommentAuthorvlz
    • CommentTimeMar 31st 2008
     permalink
    @mamazitta - I agree that it must be studied by our friends here. No doubt.
    • CommentAuthormamazitta
    • CommentTimeMar 31st 2008
     permalink
    @brittain
    Maybe this will help OpenDNS Support a little more:
    Using IE6, I went to https://www.paypal.com

    After I said Yes to accept the wrong-name certificate, I did IE: View > Privacy Report > to find out what sites were involved. These two images show it:

    http://img172.imageshack.us/img172/9344/screenshot022tu1.jpg
    http://img208.imageshack.us/img208/5199/screenshot023vq8.jpg

    I have marked (in red) where I believe the problem is.
    For the record, I do have "doubleclick.net" and "2o7.net" in my Blocked Domains.
    Note the "http://block.opendns.com/bla..bla..bla" entry. It is not https nor is the name www.opendns.com (as on certificate).
    Hopefully this additional info will be of some help in resolution.

    Good night.
    Thankful People: vlz
    • CommentAuthoraz1
    • CommentTimeMay 22nd 2008
     permalink
    Blocking advertising may be a violation of a site's terms of services, so it is roughly the equivalent of stealing a newspaper or pirating a DVD. Even if the TOS does not mention this as a legal requirement, it is implied. As mentioned, this revenue is how sites are able to provide you the content you want. If you don't like a site's ads, don't visit the site.
    Thankful People: downtownpc
    • CommentAuthormamazitta
    • CommentTimeMay 22nd 2008
     permalink
    OK. Next you are going to tell me I HAVE TO WATCH commericals on TV.

    LOL.
    Thankful People: vlz, srday, bluejohn
    • CommentAuthorexncreng
    • CommentTimeMay 25th 2008 edited
     permalink
    I don't have a problem with advertising. I'm immune to them - I just don't notice most of them no matter whether they are text or graphic. However, If my eye is distracted by an ad (usually animated graphics/Flash), then it gets zapped with Opera's "Block Content" feature.

    I just checked the list of blocked URLs and surprisingly there's only there's only 9 listed. Shows you how effective most ads are :smile:
    • CommentAuthorrotblitz
    • CommentTimeMay 26th 2008
     permalink
    @nzkiwi
    Sorry, I do not fully understand. Where did you check a list of blocked URLs and found 9?
    • CommentAuthorexncreng
    • CommentTimeMay 27th 2008
     permalink
    That's the list of addresses in Opera's "blocked Content" list (Tools > Preferences > Advanced > Content > Blocked Content).

    Maybe it's just the sites I visit, but I notice very few ads - In fact I couldn't even say what percentage of sites I visit have ads on. Having been an Internet user since the early 1990's, I guess I unconsciously block out advertisements.
    • CommentAuthormamazitta
    • CommentTimeMay 27th 2008 edited
     permalink
    Anyone can block several of the major adservers with OpenDNS Block Individual Domains:
    Dashboard > Settings > Filtering(Block Individual Domains) > enter these servers (as many/few you want) and you will block a lot of ads/tracking:

    doubleclick.net
    2o7.net <--- note letter 'o' NOT zero
    2mdn.com
    advertising.com
    atwola.com
    kontera.com
    revsci.net
    tacoda.net
    adsonar.com
    tribalfusion.com
    intellitxt.com
    hitbox.com
    adbrite.com
    chitika.net
    mediaplex.com
    fastclick.net
    clickz.com
    coremetrics.com
    adbureau.net
    zedo.com
    google-analytics.com
    googlesyndication.com

    Optionally, you can block entire countries (no dot, just the two letters):
    cn <---- this blocks all sites from China
    ru <---- this blocks all sites from Russia
    (a lot of Malware originates from here so I block them all. I don't read or speak the language anyway.)

    Also, while at Filtering (Block Categories), I suggest you block Adware in addition to other categories you wish to block.
    Make sure you hit APPLY after making your entries/selections.

    Good luck.

    edit: add info about country blocking.
    Thankful People: makvus, srday, netscrape, geremia10, mrroboto
    • CommentAuthordowntownpc
    • CommentTimeSep 28th 2008
     permalink
    I stumbled on to this thread completely by accident but fell compelled to give my $0.02.

    MOST websites rely on advertising so if everybody blocks the advertisers that these sites that rely on then the sites will either shut down or start charging for access. If you like things free then you should appreciate advertising because it means you get something for nothing and as far as TV commercials we are already seeing the effects - most notably in product placements. Those that block advertising are hurting everyone by strangling revenue from quality sites. If OpenDns were to blocks advertisers it would be both wrong and hypocritical as OpenDNS is a service that only exist as a free service because of the advertising revenue it gets. Seems to me if you don't like advertisements you shouldn't use OpenDNS at all.
    • CommentAuthorrotblitz
    • CommentTimeSep 30th 2008
     permalink
    @downtownpc
    The problem with the above mentioned sites is not so much that they serve advertising, I could eventually live with it, but that they almost spy (or track or audit) our surfing and other internet behavior to get a profile of us to serve us with the "right" ads. However, nobody is really able to control what other things can happen with this, our private, personal and intimate information, collected by people and servers we do not know. We have a fundamental right of privacy, and we have a fundamental right if not obligation to protect our privacy against any possible abuse. I am convinced that blocking these tracking sites is acceptable for these good reasons. Convince me about the contrary!
  6.  permalink
    OK, my 2 cents:

    It doesn't really matter if you block ads or not, unless advertisers are able to check as to whether or not the ads are blocked. If you aren't clicking through the ads anyway, it hardly matters.

    AdBlock Plus users: May I suggest NoScript. Aside from other points of security and configurability offered by NoScript, it will block the scripts that call the ads in the first place. I find that blocking with NoScript, then following up with AdBlock Plus for ads served via html or otherwise works quite well.

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