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    • CommentAuthorobamaguy
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2010
     permalink
    I found out about OpenDNS in the strangest way. One day, I was looking to peruse my usual porno sites when I found I had been blocked - by Comcast nonetheless. Here is what it said:

    This domain is blocked.

    We prevented you from loading this page as part of our safer, faster, and smarter Internet Services. Thank you for using Comcast.

    This site was categorized in: Nudity, Pornography

    It had the Comcast logo to the right, but the website address was under block.opendns.com, so that's how I discovered opendns. What's going on, is comcast using opendns to block "inapropriate" websites? Is there a way I can get around this? This kind of seems to have come out from nowhere and it's strange. I tried using a proxy, but comcast/opendns is blocking them too. Thoughts?
  1.  permalink
    Open up a support ticket with us, and let us know the public IP address you were connecting to at the time. As far as we're aware, Comcast is not a user of ours, so it may be a Comcast employee, a local branch somewhere, etc.
    • CommentAuthorrotblitz
    • CommentTimeOct 22nd 2010
     permalink
    @obamaguy
    Most likely you inherited an OpenDNS (and Comcast) user's former IP address, and this user customized his/her block pages with the Comcast logo. In the worst case he might be doing this with many IP addresses, all he has got in between over time, just to cause this what you just experience.

    No mention that this is an inacceptable if not criminal attitude, so yes, do what @Marc said.
    http://www.opendns.com/support/contact/
    • CommentAuthorRed Prince
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2010
     permalink
    >>Most likely you inherited an OpenDNS (and Comcast) user's former IP address, and this user customized his/her block pages with the Comcast logo.<<

    @rotblitz: I don't think so. He said that was how he discovered OpenDNS. If he never as much as heard about OpenDNS, inheriting someone else's IP address would not have caused the block because he would not be resolving through OpenDNS.

    If he is using the default DNS servers, then it was the Comcast DNS server that returned the block IP address to his browser.

    Unless, of course, he is not the sysadmin and his father, or whoever, configured OpenDNS on the router and made it look like Comcast to trick him.

    @obamaguy: So, Mr. President, are you the sysadmin of your network or are you using your parents' network, or whoever else's network? Because if you are the sysadmin, it looks like at least someone at Comcast is responsible for it. But if you are not, then you need to discuss it with your sysadmin.
    • CommentAuthorobamaguy
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2010
     permalink
    Yes, but aren't IP addresses in flux? Don't they change like, constantly? Could that possibly be the reason?

    Also, isn't a sysadmin employed by a communications company to operate a network? Can I change my network settings to make opendns whitelist a site, or would that not work?
    • CommentAuthorrotblitz
    • CommentTimeOct 23rd 2010 edited
     permalink
    @Red Prince
    "I don't think so. He said that was how he discovered OpenDNS..."

    Oops, yes, it was obviously quite late here, tired and no concentration... :shamed:

    @obamaguy
    "Yes, but aren't IP addresses in flux? Don't they change like, constantly?"

    Most IP addresses for home and other small networks are dynamic, but do not really change constantly, but e.g. once daily, or once monthly, or whatever the ISP thinks is appropriate for them.
    http://www.opendns.com/support/dynamic_ip/

    "Could that possibly be the reason?"

    In your case the first "problem" is, as @Red Prince said, that you use OpenDNS for your DNS lookups at all, else your IP address wouldn't matter. So, someone intendedly configured the network you're using (home, school, university, club, public WiFi) to use the OpenDNS servers for name resolution.

    "Also, isn't a sysadmin employed by a communications company to operate a network?"

    We are not talking about the ISP, like Comcast, but about (sub)networks like, as said, home, school, university, club, internet cafe, WiFi hotspot, ...
    The person who is able to maintain such a network is called network admin.

    If you are your own network admin, find out where the OpenDNS server addresses are configured:
    https://store.opendns.com/setup/

    "Can I change my network settings to make opendns whitelist a site, or would that not work?"

    Yes, if you want to continue using OpenDNS for your DNS lookups (i.e. for name resolution), and if you are your own network admin, this is the option to go for.
    • CommentAuthorobamaguy
    • CommentTimeOct 24th 2010
     permalink
    What are my options if I am not a network admin and don't care whether or not I use OpenDNS at all?
    • CommentAuthorrotblitz
    • CommentTimeOct 24th 2010
     permalink
    "What are my options if I am not a network admin"

    Aha! This would explain why you surprisingly found OpenDNS in effect one day. Your network admin has enabled it, pretty clear.

    Apparently you are not happy with the settings this network admin has chosen. Because you are an admin on your computer (are you?), you may be able to configure an alternative DNS service on your computer as of https://store.opendns.com/setup/computer/ - but not using the OpenDNS addresses. If this does not work, you are pretty out of luck, and you had to talk to your network admin.
    • CommentAuthorobamaguy
    • CommentTimeOct 25th 2010
     permalink
    an alternative DNS service? I've already taken the steps referred to in your link and am using 208.67.220.220 (the OpenDNS address) as my "alternate DNS server". What other address could I use?
    • CommentAuthorzelus
    • CommentTimeOct 25th 2010
     permalink
    Obamaguy, what rotblitz is trying to say is that if you don't care which DNS service you're using then you can change the DNS settings in your computer yourself. You can change your DNS settings so that you use another provider other than OpenDNS or your ISP. There are many DNS providers out there.
    Thankful People: szh
    • CommentAuthorszh
    • CommentTimeOct 25th 2010 edited
     permalink
    "You can change your DNS settings so that you use another provider other than OpenDNS or your ISP. There are many DNS providers out there."

    If obamaguy is choosing not to use OpenDNS and stick with standard DNS access, then using the ISP's servers is probably best - they are the "closest" servers (most likely) to their customers systems and are likely to provide the quickest DNS responses, etc.

    Z
    • CommentAuthorrotblitz
    • CommentTimeOct 25th 2010
     permalink
    But, as he isn't the network admin, therefore not the owner of this internet connection, how should he obtain the ISP's DNS server addresses? :confused:
    This link can help with alternative DNS server addresses:
    https://ssl.scroogle.org/cgi-bin/nbbwssl.cgi?Gw=public+DNS+server+addresses
    Thankful People: szh
    • CommentAuthorjlivingood
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2010 edited
     permalink
    I think as has been made clear already, this isn't a residential Comcast Internet service (I do know some schools and so on that use this sort of thing). As always, a screen shot that shows the IP address / URL in the browser is always helpful since that is usually the best way to determine what device/service is doing content filtering.

    - JL
    Comcast
    Thankful People: maintenance
    • CommentAuthorszh
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2010
     permalink
    "But, as he isn't the network admin, therefore not the owner of this internet connection, how should he obtain the ISP's DNS server addresses?"

    Well, that is a good question, I suppose! :neutral:

    I am not a Comcast customer (my home network is via Earthlink). When I set up the account, they gave me the two IP addresses of the DNS servers they wanted me to use on the modem that connects to them.

    As I recall, it is also available on their web site under the setup instructions.

    Doesn't Comcast at least do that? Surely, a call to their support folks would get this info pretty easily?
    • CommentAuthorobamaguy
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2010
     permalink
    Ok, I've tried using proxies, downloading proxies and some other techniques, but none of them give satisfieing results, most don't get around opendns at all. I don't want opendns. My experience with it so far have been disheartening and the service is so annoying, I don't want to ever see it again. I don't know where it came from or how it got onto my computer, but I want to extricate it from my server permanently. Is there any way at all I can take this away so I can browse the web freely?
  2.  permalink
    OpenDNS is not an installed software, but rather a setting that was *explicitly* changed by you or someone else on your computer, router or network (this COULD include a technician from your ISP or an IT repair person!!!!!).

    See http://www.opendns.com/support/article/140 for detailed instructions on changing the DNS servers back to your ISP's DNS servers.

    (Bear in mind that the instructions show how to set up the service – you will NOT need to create a network or an account – simply follow the instructions to see HOW the service was enabled, so that you may disable it!)
    • CommentAuthorobamaguy
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2010
     permalink
    I tried doing that - going to the network connections and checking "Obtain DNS server addresses automatically." Absolutely no change whatsoever.

    By the way, my blocking message has changed. Now it just says, "The system administrator has block this site for your safety.", with no reference to comcast whatsoever.
    • CommentAuthorrotblitz
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2010
     permalink
    @obamaguy
    I thought we agreed that you are not your network admin, did we?

    "What are my options if I am not a network admin...?"

    And I thought I said what you have to do:
    1. Either talk to your network admin to disable OpenDNS,
    2. Or try to use an alternative DNS service, different from OpenDNS.
    (I had provided a link to find out such services.)

    So, what else is left? We can't do anything more for you, really!
    Thankful People: OpenDNS User

This discussion has been inactive for longer than 30 days, and is thus closed.