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Vanilla 1.1.4 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

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  1.  permalink
    Really odd situation here. I was traveling this week and stayed at a Sheraton hotel. I used the ethernet cable in my room to get on the internet. I use OpenDNS at home to block adult content from my home network. Well, someone, without me doing anything but browsing, I found that the Sheraton's network has been added to the list of my networks in OpenDNS. I can see its stats. I get emails from people asking me to unblock various porn sites. I don't want this. I have no idea how it happened. I'd like to undo it.

    (Also, when I returned home, my own network isn't blocking adult content (despite the settings being set to in my OpenDNS panel).

    Any help? Has this happened to anyone else before?
    • CommentAuthorrotblitz
    • CommentTimeMay 4th 2012
     permalink
    It happens to everybody running the OpenDNS Updater outside their own network.
    OpenDNS is for networks you own, not for your devices in other networks.

    You simply have hi-jacked the hotel's IP address.
    Visit your dashboard https://dashboard.opendns.com/settings/
    If you have more than one network, delete the one with the hotel's IP address. If there is only one network, apply your own IP address. This should solve your two problems.

    As next uninstall the Updater from your roaming device (laptop or so), so that this doesn't happen again.
    Thankful People: zelus
  2.  permalink
    Thanks. Have deleted the other network. My laptop is my only device, so I don't think I'll uninstall the updater... I'll just be careful to turn it off when traveling... (seems like odd design though... to allow anyone on a network to run updater and get access to the settings... )
    Thankful People: zelus
    • CommentAuthorrotblitz
    • CommentTimeMay 4th 2012
     permalink
    "seems like odd design though... to allow anyone on a network to run updater and get access to the settings..."

    How would you prevent a program to run on a computer where the operator is administrator? No way! The program runs merely on a computer, not so much on a network.

    How would you prevent an owner of his OpenDNS settings to get access to them? This doesn't make sense!

    But you are right, the hotel's network admin could have stopped you doing so while e.g. blocking access to the update server of OpenDNS. Have you done this, as the admin of your own network? Most likely not! So don't expect other people doing it...

    Whatever, there is no better design. It's up to any network admins to prevent people from hi-jacking their IP address - or even not.

This discussion has been inactive for longer than 30 days, and is thus closed.